Sunday, June 21, 2009

The Glorious Morning Glory

One of the things I attempted to grow when I first began outdoor gardening is Morning Glory. How can you resist flowers that look like this:






(Photos from MorgueFile)

Nothing beats this popular, undemanding, fast-growing annual for attractive blooms that come in a variety of colours, including pink, red, purple, blue and white.

I am considering adding this popular vine to my new home’s garden, which won’t really come to life until next year. Since I can provide the sun it needs to thrive and the space for it to spread out, it's on my list of ‘plants of interest’.

The large, funnel-shaped leaves also attract butterflies and hummingbirds, so, you know, just more reason to consider it.

4 comments:

  1. I always have some morning glories in the garden and the seeds are so easy to save for the following years.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Crafty Gardener, the ease of saving seeds just makes this plant that much more appealing. I always had these flowers growing in my garden in the past, so there’s a good chance they’ll be added for the upcoming garden. They are so pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I adore morning glories. I love the heart-shaped leaves and the fact that the flowers seem to be illuminated from within. We do have to be careful here in the southern U.S. because, once planted, they reseed themselves and grow...ahem...VERY enthusiastically. I planted them last year so they'd grow up my porch lattice in front, which they did. In fact, they sort of took my porch over. And this year, they have reseeded so plentifully that I've had to constantly check my other plants to make sure they don't have morning glories entwined about their stems.

    Good luck with your move!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Beth! I'm sorry for taking so long to reply to your comment; I was offline for a few days because of my move. But I'm finally back and looking forward to rejoining the blog world!

    Morning glories are beautiful! I love them and hope to get some in my yard. Our gardening season is very short here because of our long, cold winters, so these pretty plants don't have a chance to spread out as much as they'd like.

    Thanks for your good wishes for the move. It is all over now and we're happily settling into our new home!

    ReplyDelete