Thursday, August 5, 2010

Today's Trivia - Events of the 70s

I spent my childhood years (also known as the middle years, ages 6 - 12) and my early teens in the 1970s; the psychedelic, flower power, free love, ‘anything goes’ era. It consisted of interesting things such as mood rings, lava lamps, disco balls, skateboards, strobe lights, 8-track tapes, CB radios, avocado green appliances, smiley faces, sea monkeys and pinball machines. And a whole bunch of other stuff.


Did you grow up during that period? How well do you know it? Below are events of the 70’s (in no particular order). In case you didn’t know or don’t remember...


In the 70s...

...bar codes were introduced.

... Disney World opened.

...the Beatles broke up.

...the FDA (Food and Drugs Administration) approved Lithium to treat manic-depressives.

...the Viking Probe landed on Mars and sent back pictures of rocky terrain.

...Nadia Comaneci was given seven perfect tens at the 1976 Olympics.

...China became the fifth nation to put a satellite into orbit.

...Microsoft was founded.

...the Soviet Union and NASA sent probes to Mars.

...disposable razors were introduced.

...lyme disease was first discovered.

...Sony introduced the walkman.

...Beverly Johnson became the first black model on the cover of Vogue, a major fashion magazine.

...the heimlich maneuver was developed.

...girls were allowed to play in Little League baseball.

..President Ford granted limited amnesty to draft dodgers.

...the first pocket calculators became widespread. The introduction of cheap large-scale integrated (LSI) chips made it possible for a calculator to be cheaper and smaller.

...floppy discs were invented.

...India tested its first nuclear bomb.

...the first home computer, Altair, was launched.

...Ray Tomlinson invented email.

...the microprocessor was introduced which was the foundation of all computers.

...Bangladesh was created from East Pakistan.

...China joined the United Nations.

...CAT scanning, the most important medical breakthrough since the X-ray, was introduced.

...the cellular phone battery was invented.

...the Vietnam war ended.

...abortion was legalized in the United States.

...the Bahamas became independent.

... Iranian students stormed the US embassy and held 52 of the 66 people in the embassy hostage for 444 days.

... Egypt and Syria attacked Israel.

...there was a nuclear accident at Three Mile Island in the United States.

...Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was first used to map the brain and other parts of the body.

...Elvis Presley died.

...the first test tube baby was born using in vitro fertilization.

...ultrasound was first used.

...the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan.

...Mother Teresa was awarded the Nobel peace prize.

...ESPN began broadcasting.

...cartoon character Garfield the cat was syndicated.

...US president Nixon resigned over the Watergate scandal.

...Egyptian president Anwar al-Sadat was the first Arab leader to visit Israel and acknowledge Israel's right to exist.

...the Alaskan pipeline was completed.

...the Star Wars movie was released.


So, how many of the events above did you remember?

4 comments:

  1. I'm a little older than you, Martha, but I came of age in the seventies, too. But I'll have to confess, I wasn't aware of a lot of these events at that time, though I do very clearly remember watching Nadia Comaneci and seeing that performance. I'm a rather tall, large-boned ungainly person, so the easy grace and agility of gymnasts has always fascinated me. She was amazing.

    Thanks for a fascinating trip down Memory Lane!

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  2. Beth, I was a little young during that period to remember these events (or to have even paid attention to them), but, like you, I remember Nadia Comaneci clearly. My family and I watched the olymipics on TV and she was a household name. Plus, the olympics that year were performed in my city; I was born and raised in Montreal, and lived there until last year when we moved to Kingston.

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