Thursday, May 10, 2012

Around the Garden

The garden is growing in leaps and bounds. It won’t be long before there’s an explosion of colour. Some of the plants have developed their flower buds and the anticipation of when those flowers will open is more than I can handle.

Come along with me as I stroll around the garden, and we’ll check out what’s going on.


Aquilegia 'McKana Hybrids', a columbine, has grown into a monster. There are many flower buds waiting to open, but no flowers yet in sight. Come on, sweet plant, get to it already!




Clematis 'Niobe' is growing beautifully, and loaded with buds. I have never grown clematis before, so I am quite flattered that it is doing so well in my amateur hands. I can’t wait till the spectacular flowers make an appearance.




My Purpleleaf Sand Cherry is putting on quite a show with its lovely blooms.




Syringa meyeri 'Palibin', a dwarf lilac, is a tiny little tree that is no more than five feet tall. But despite its small size, it is growing flowers that will smell heavenly.



This is Agastache blue fortune; one of my most beloved plants. It will grow huge by the end of the month and fill up with gorgeous flowers that will last until the fall. It is a favourite hangout for bees and butterflies, so you can imagine how many times I’ll be stopping by there with my camera.



The flowers on Viola sororia ‘Freckles’ really do look like they have freckles on them. You can see the blooms on the plant, but they’re not quite ready yet. Perhaps in the next few days, I’ll get to photograph them.



Like the other columbine, Aquilegia alpina is growing rapidly into a large plant.



Lamiastrum galeobdolon ‘Hermann’s Pride’ shows off pretty yellow flowers, which should be coming up soon, but even when the blooms fade away, the plant is a beautiful addition because of its gorgeous foliage.



Pulmonaria saccharata ‘Sissinghurst White’ is in full bloom, and I’ve been meaning to get closer with the camera for some macro shots of the tiny flowers. But I haven’t. Yet. So this is all there is to show.



Chelone obliqua, commonly known as Pink Turtlehead, produces large, bright-pink hooded flowers beginning in late summer, so it may be awhile before buds develop. In the meantime, it’s a pretty foliage plant.



These tiny pink blooms belong to the lovely Pulmonaria ‘Raspberry Splash’. It is among the most dependable and showy spring-blooming perennials, and the foliage stays attractive throughout the gardening season.




This is Heuchera americana 'Dale's Strain', which is especially attractive in spring and late fall. Heucheras are extremely popular because of their stunning array of leaf colours, shapes, sizes and textures. I have a few of them planted in various flower beds.



And that’s it for this garden stroll. There’ll be many more coming along, and I’ll let you know when they happen in case you’d like to tag along.

12 comments:

  1. The growth in the garden is looking great, with lots of promise of blooms to come soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With the weather warming up, it is growing rapidly. It's a very exciting time of year!

      Delete
  2. Thanks for the wonderful tour. Now that I have to live in the city I don't have much of a garden but I do have a purple sand cherry which i was thrilled to find was on my little patch of condo turf. Unfortunately I think I'm supposed to prune it. Which I didn't do this year. Do you prune yours and how much and where do you clip/cut??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prune mine after it is done flowering. There isn't an exact amount that I cut; I just keep it shaped nicely, and at a size that I like. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to just prune as much as I'd like, but the plant looks great, so maybe it doesn't mind.

      Delete
  3. Great pics though I am not a gardener. My wife does however make me rototill hers every year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Travis. Even though you're not a gardener, you are a gardener's helper, and that's worth quite a bit.

      Delete
  4. Thanks for letting me tag along, Martha...that was a lovely stroll. I'm amazed at how springlike everything looks there, while it looks like the middle of the summer here. We had such a warm winter that it seems like everything is blooming about a month ahead of time. Your flowers are so beautiful---I can't decide which ones I like best. I wish I could have columbine here, but our southern exposure and lack of shade makes them hard to grow. I've always thought they looked like flowers the fairies might live in. By the way, the pink turtlehead grows wild here. There's a trail nearby (to Devil's Courthouse!) that's lined with it.

    Wow...I sure do ramble, don't I? :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our weather takes much longer to get really warm, so everything looks fresh here. It starts to look a little tired in July when we have a heat wave. I love columbine, but you are right, they don't tolerate the sun and heat very well. I usually prune back mine after they're done flowering because they start to look tired.

      Delete
  5. Love that purple leaf sand cherry!
    And I am sure you know of the Sissinghurst Castle Gardens and that there is one that is an all white- the White Garden! I have always wanted to see it!
    Can't wait to see everything bloom! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love white in the garden! I find it to be such an elegant colour. I've planted some perennials that produce white blooms, and they are some of my favourites.

      Delete
  6. I loved this tour Martha, thanks! You have so many flowering plants and they all look so healthy.I especially love that columbine! We have a 'wild' one growing rampant everywhere......help! It is very invasive and chokes out all that is around......the 'wild' one is very aggressive, but pretty too!
    Just wait till you see that Niobe clematis i bloom....it is one of our favourites.
    When's your next tour?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't wait till Niobe clematis blooms. The buds are there but they're still not open. I swear the plant is teasing me! There'll be a lot of tours throughout the season as the plants grow; no doubt about that.

      Delete