Friday, June 8, 2012

The First Photography Class

So I started my photography course this past Tuesday, and I’d like to say that it was exciting, but the first class was mostly technical and informative, so it wasn’t. We spent the time learning about camera and image basics, things we have to know before we can move on to getting down and dirty with the camera.



It’s a small group - only three of us (students) - and I’m quite pleased about that. I already knew it would be this way before I signed up; the course, which is offered in a home-based studio, concentrates on minimum 3 and maximum 7 students at a time.



The teacher, who also teaches (or has taught at the local college), seems to know his stuff. It’s only the first class, mind you, but I feel confident about this. I hope I’m right.



The other two students, one man and one woman, both around my age, seemed nice enough. The man has been using a DSLR camera for two years and is quite comfortable with it. The woman – like me - just recently acquired one, and is eager to learn how to use it to its full potential.



Signing up for this course was a huge step for me. It’s the first time since we moved here three years ago that I’ve actually joined something. I did attend one meeting at the local gardening club last spring, but the vast majority of members were quite older than me, so I never went back. I think it’ll be something I’ll revisit in...oh...about 20 years from now.



My husband asked me what I thought about the teacher. His question is actually two-fold: 1) What do I think about him as a teacher? And 2) How do I feel about him as a person? On a professional level the teacher seems quite knowledgeable, and I’m convinced that I’ll learn a few valuable things. On a personal level, I’m not sure yet. I’m a quiet and measured observer; I take my time getting a feel on people and forming an opinion by watching them. What they say. How they treat others. Body language. The look in their eyes. And all that stuff. If I was just interested in this one course, this wouldn’t matter. But because this teacher offers other courses that I may be interested in signing up for it matters very much. If I don’t like him on a personal level, I won’t be registering for any other classes. That’s just the way it is with me.



My 14-year-old daughter is the most excited about this course. When I got home, she asked “So, how was your class?” followed by “Did you have fun?” and finally “Did you meet anyone?” The reason for her last question is that she’s “very concerned” about my happiness. In the three years since we’ve moved here, I haven’t really attached myself to anyone. I do have acquaintances, I am friendly with my neighbours and my husband and I have been out socially with others, but I haven’t really made ‘friends’ in the true sense of the word. I still have strong ties with friends and family in my old city, and keep in touch with them, but I haven’t made those types of roots here yet. So she’s “anxious” about my social life (or lack of, she has said a few times), and “worried” that dear old mom might be feeling alone and discontented. Sweet kid. If she could schedule play dates for me, she probably would.



“Not to worry” I have told her. “It takes time for me to connect with new poeple. First of all, I don’t need a lot of interaction, but most importantly, I’m very selective of who I add to my circle. Because I don’t need a lot of people, just a few good ones.”

She nods her head when I explain this to her, but I don’t think she believes me. In any case, she’s thrilled that I’m taking this course. And less “worried” about me.



Next week will consist of two classes; a theoretical one on Tuesday and a photoshoot on Saturday to practice what we’ve learned. I don’t know yet where we’ll be meeting for the photoshoot, but it should be fun. I do hope the weather is nice that day. I’ll write more about this course if there’s something worth writing about. If not, I won’t. I’ll just keep sharing photos I take and we’ll see if there’s a noticeable difference in my skills.


20 comments:

  1. I think you already take brilliant photos Martha,but it never hurts to learn new stuff. I know what you mean about the teacher. We signed up for Italian classes one year and the only reason I stuck it out was because the teacher was very down to earth and friendly. I'm not a joiner either, and the most I say to the neighbours is "Hello". Aren't they the lucky ones! Ha!

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    1. Thank you, Kitten, but it is nice to learn new things. This course is all about the technical aspects of photography. Basically, I'll learn what the heck all thos features are on my camera!

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  2. Your daughter sounds so sweet! And I agree with Sulky Kitten, I'm not sure what else this fellow could teach you but I will gladly look at the results. I'm wondering where you are going for the first shoot? Should be interesting!!!

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    1. I'm going to find out this week where the photoshoot is. I hope we have decent weather for it. And I hope this next class is a far more interesting one.

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  3. A photography course is something I would love to take. Looking forward to hearing your comments on the class and seeing your photos.

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    1. I'll write a little more about the course if there's something worth writing about. I sure hope there is!

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  4. Your daughter sounds familiar - mine also spent many years worrying about my social life - or lack of it. She's only just started to accept I have a different personality type - and that I'm actually quite content :) Your photography class sounds great - have fun and I look forward to hearing what you're learning!

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    1. My daughter is in-between an introvert and extrovert, so there's only so much time she can spend alone. Once her batteries are recharged (which doesn't take long), she needs to get together with people. She can't really relate to my quieter pace; it just doesn't make sense to her kind (as you know from your own daughter.)

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  5. The photo of the dragonfly is AWESOME! Very cool. It's great that your taking that class -- for social reasons and psychological reasons, it's very important and just great to get out there and do it. So many people seem to just sit around and think about what they'dlike to be doing...it's great that you're not just thinking about it, but are actually doing something!

    And p.s. you shoudl go out for drinks or coffee with your fellow photography students.

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    1. I couldn't believe I caught that dragonfly. It took quite a few shots, though, but well worth the ffort. Yes, it is very good to get out there, and I always pursue things I enjoy. If this course turns out great, I will continue with more photography lessons. I'll have to see how things pan out with the other students.

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  6. Sounds like fun! Love the last close-up of Squirrely Squirrel!

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    1. Squirrely squirrel is a regular in my backyard, so he's a prime photo candidate!

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  7. I every time spent my half an hour to read this website's articles or reviews daily along with a mug of coffee.
    My homepage find a career in digital photos

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    1. That's really nice. I'll have to take a look at your site.

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  8. Hehe, the gardening club reminds me of that German gardening forum - online, it's not so noticeable, but when I go to meetings, most of the others could be my grandparents! Even the next youngest after me is old enough to be my mother. (But I find that kind of funny, so I don't feel uncomfortable.)
    Attending a course can be hard for us introverts, right? I took Dutch classes last year, and it's so hard for me to talk in a language I don't speak well yet - feels so embarrassing (even though I think I was a pretty good student).

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    1. Yes, attending a course can be hard for us introverts, but it's something I really don't mind doing. I'd rather go there than some busy, noisy social event. I'd like to also locate a book club and some type of gardening club eventually. We'll see as time progresses where I end up.

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  9. Love the dragonfly and the 'post in the water' shots!
    A course eh? I remember a course I took at UBC in Vancouver. The first thing the instructor told us was that he wasn't going to teach us 'how to use the camera'! We would have to figure that out for ourselves.
    The course was about 'learning to use our eye' when taking pictures. We would be assigned different 'shoots' each week, then at the next class we'd critique each other's interpretation of the previous weeks assignment.
    It was very interesting to see what other people 'saw' and how they interpreted the assignment.

    Anyway, I am sure you will get something out of your course and it is very good that there are only 3 of you there.

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    1. This course is specifically about using the camera's features. What is this, that and the next thing for? And that's what I'd like to learn. I have read my camera's manual, but having it explained by someone who is an 'expert' is even better. I don't think any teacher can teach you to be creative; you have to have an eye for that. He offers another course on creativity, which sounds like what you're talking about, and I'm considering joining it at some point. It all depends on how this course goes.

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  10. I think taking courses on subjects one enjoys is one of the neatest and most fun ways to spend time. Good on you for joining, and trust me, you'll learn a ton by the time you're done.

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    1. It is definitely a lot of fun to attend these types of courses. If all goes well, I will pursue this further. We'll see what happens.

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