Monday, September 24, 2012

Midlife Crisis? No, Thank You

“Wisdom doesn't necessarily come with age. Sometimes age just shows up all by itself.”
- Tom Wilson -

Apparently, most people will experience some form of emotional transition between the ages of 40 and 60 – an experience that is better known as a midlife crisis. This crisis happens to us when, as adults, we fully realize our mortality and become aware of how much time we have left on this earth, and that life is certainly more than halfway through. Maybe even more than that for some of us.


Well, I’ll be 48 in February, which puts me right in the midst of this probable process, but it hasn’t happened yet. And hopefully never will. Plus, you know, I just don’t have time for this nonsense at this point in time. One of my daughters is still in the adolescent stage – she’s only 15 – and I need to stay sane focused enough to deal with the teen angst that is part of that period. If I go off the deep end, I won’t be there to deal with the snarky attitude, moodiness, the rolling eyes, exasperated sigh and know-it-allness, and someone else will have to step in for that responsibility. Hmmm...[scratching head]...doesn’t seem like such a bad thing.


Or maybe I am having a midlife crisis on a mild level and just haven’t noticed. Is that possible? Although it certainly wouldn’t be much fun if that’s the case. If I’m going to have a midlife crisis, I want a full blown, down and dirty one. Drop everything, run away from home, get on a plane, backpack through Europe and explore the world type. No wimpy little crisis for this gal. If I’m going to have one, damn it, I want one that will rock my entire world.

But...then I’d feel guilty about leaving my kids behind.

And my husband.

And the pets...

*Sigh*

Maybe I’ll just stick to dying my hair in a different shade every three months.


18 comments:

  1. Ha! I think I had my midlife crisis when I was a child. It hasn't finished yet!

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  2. I don't have time for a crisis of any sort, I'm past the age they say it will happen. But then again maybe it came when the kids were all teenagers and it just got accepted as part of everyday life.

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    1. That may be it, Crafty. When our kids are teens, you really can't tell the difference!

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  3. I think that midlife crises hit those people hardest of all who have lived their lives to that point without a lot of introspection. That's why it hits them like a Mack truck -- no groundwork or foundation has been laid for contemplating the big questions of life.

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    1. You are probably right, Debra. Having that foundation to cushion you along the way certainly makes sense.

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  4. Debra is right, although I hate to admit it. I tried to be a perfect teacher and perfect friend for so many years - always putting others first. Not because I was particularly kind, but because I was hooked on the attention it got me. But you can only keep the pretense up so long. I started making mistakes, became less of a go-to person. I absolutely went to pieces. I'm okay with making mistakes now but I would still like to rule the world. :)

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    1. You are right, Francie, it's hard to keep the pretense up. Sooner or later it crashes. I'm glad you are at peace with all that now. And you go out there and rule the world! :)

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  5. I had a sweet, sweet cousin who died of a brain tumor just months after her 50th birthday. She did not get to have her 50's, so I decided I am not going to think about my age, I am going to enjoy every minute, every day, every year, every decade of my life and to hell with this youth oriented culture!

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    1. That's the way to look at it, Kay! The youth oriented culture is not for me, either. I am grateful to be alive, enjoying each and every moment.

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  6. I still feel like I am 20. That is good enough for me.

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  7. For my midlife crisis I want to wrestle a tiger until it giggles. Thanks for only coloring your hair every three months, it's less likely to break off that way and you keep them guessing!

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  8. Thank your kids for possibly saving you from this! Not to worry Martha, I think you could any crises with ease....nothing you haven't thought about before.

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    1. Yes, my kids keep me focused! Thanks for the kind words, Jim. I hope I could face any crisis with ease. But also hope I don't have to face many of them!

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  9. At least you said the number of years .. I can't and REFUSE to even say fooooorrrrttttyyy... that is where I draw the line.

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    1. Hellas, it's just a number. Take pride in the person you are, and what's inside! That's when you never grow old.

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