Thursday, October 18, 2012

A Brave And Inspirational Young Girl

"I felt hurt on opening my wardrobe and seeing my uniform, school bag and geometry box.
Boys' schools are opening tomorrow, but the Taliban have banned girls' education."
- Malala Yousafzai -
(Diary entry, 8 February 2009)
 

Just when I thought extremist buffoons couldn’t sink any lower, they commit another despicable crime...this time against a young girl. A girl who wants nothing more than to get an education.

Bastards.

On October 8th, the Pakistani Taliban, a bunch of fanatical bullies, attempted to assassinate 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai. 14 years old! She was on her way home from school when a gunman boarded her school bus, asked for her by name, and then shot her in the head and neck.

Spineless thug.

Shame on you.

[take a deep breath...]

Okay...

You’ve probably learned of this incident by now, and know who Malala Yousafzai is. But for those of you who don’t:

“She is known for her education and women’s rights activism in the Swat Valley, where the Taliban has at times banned girls from attending school. In early 2009, at the age of 11, Yousafzai came to prominence through a blog she wrote for the BBC detailing her life under Taliban rule, their attempts to take control of the valley, and her views on promoting education for girls. The following summer, a New York Times documentary was filmed about her life as the Pakistani military intervened in the region, culminating in the Second Battle of Swat. Yousafzai began to rise in prominence, giving interviews in print and on television, and taking a position as chairperson of the District Child Assembly Swat. She has since been nominated for the International Children's Peace Prize by Desmond Tutu, and has won Pakistan's first National Youth Peace Prize.” (source)

And all that at such a young age.

I watched the New York Times documentary, which I’ve included below, and it is quite remarkable. In it you will get to meet one of Malala’s greatest inspirations – her father. It's no wonder this young girl has turned out to be so wise, mature and brave with such a loving role model who is profoundly proud and supportive of his daughter in every which way. I pray that this exceptional young lady recovers fully. She is a leader, and she has the potential to make great changes in this world.

(The video is a little long, but well worth watching. Perhaps you can watch it a little at a time.)



We’ve made huge strides in the fight for equal rights for women, but incidences such as these remind me that we still have a long, long way to go. Perhaps Malala will help lead the way.

“The education and empowerment of women throughout the world cannot
fail to result in a more caring, tolerant, just and peaceful life for all.”
- Aung San Suu Kyi -

20 comments:

  1. I hope she makes a full recovery. It both enrages and disgusts me, the heinous acts carried out by people in the name of religion.

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    1. I feel the same way, Sulky. It just drives me nuts.

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  2. I'm hoping that Islamic people's rage against the Taliban for this horrible act will result in some real change or moderation -- will the Taliban learn its lesson?

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    1. I think their voices are important to make changes and put a stop to these people. Let's hope something gives with this terrible act.

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  3. So horrribly sad! There are some terrible things happening in our world. Puts things in perspective and reminds us that changes need to happen. Yet we feel so helpless. It is good to be aware of what is going on though, that is the first step to change I think.

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    1. Yes, being aware is certainly the first step. Taking action should follow.

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  4. Such a brave and brilliant little girl! I saw part of the interview with her and she had decided she wanted to be a politician so she could help change her country. I hope she makes a full recovery and is able to fulfill her dreams.

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    1. I hope so, too. She has the potential to do great things.

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  5. This young human being is here because she has a message for us all. Her wisdom, her courage and her actions are breath-taking and humbling.

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    1. You are absolutely right, Jim. She is a very special little soul.

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  6. Wow. What I can't believe is how young she was/is! 11 when she wrote for BBC? And 14 now being shot at? Jeez. I was building forts and climbing trees when I was 11. Crazy that someone so young has so much knowledge and courage! Jeez. I'd never even heard of her.

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    1. I know...it is remarkable! I guess kids living in such difficult areas have no choice but to grow up much faster.

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  7. My heart aches for her and all of the young people forced to live in such circumstances. Thanks for speaking out, Martha. I hope the outrage grows.

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    1. My heart aches, too, Francie. These children deserve much better.

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  8. I am amazed by the forthright nature of such a young girl, and how clear her mind is for what is equal and right. I pray for her full recovery. And I pray that people around the globe understand what one small girl goes through just to get what should be a given in equal rights. She is amazing, and an inspiration to all of us.

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    1. You are right; she should not be struggling like this for something as simple as an education. She is an amazing young girl and I hope she fully recovers.

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  9. they can shoot a little girl, but they cannot wipe us all off the face of the earth!

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    1. You got it, Ana. We need to stay united to fight this type of evil.

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  10. I am happy you covered this story Martha... great to see this activist part of you. Keep them coming.

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