Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Today's Trivia - Ghost Towns

The Canadian province of Ontario, which is where I live, has a significant number of ghost towns. Most of them are located in the central and northern regions, but a smaller number of them can be found throughout the province.


A ghost town is a deserted village, town or city settlement that was once populated and flourishing. An area often becomes abandoned because the economic activity that supported it has failed, or natural or manmade disasters have made it uninhabitable. Some of these areas are revived because they become tourist attractions with their period-specific architecture. But most of them simply fade away, inevitably reclaimed by the natural elements that surround them.

18 comments:

  1. Ooh, what stories could this place tell.. I remember visiting Eldon House in London (Ont), which is almost 180 years old, but that place has been wonderfully preserved -- how different from this sad, lonesome home.

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    1. We have places like that here, as well, and they are a joy to visit. When we drive out to the rural areas, we happen upon abandoned homes quite often. They truly are sad-looking, and I always wonder how they came to be this way.

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  2. Oh I'm with Janice! I wonder what interesting stories these places have to tell?

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    1. I always wonder who lived in them, and how they came to be abandoned.

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  3. Lots of small hamlets on the prairies have faded away to ghost towns too -- usually once the railway line is discontinued. Soon they exist only in memory and eventually, not even there.

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  4. Back in the 1960's I was taken to Keenansville (pronounced Keensville), a ghost town near Colgan, Ontario, in Simcoe county, that dates back to the 1840s. In the 19th century, it was a thriving centre with Post Office, Saw Mill, Woollen Mill, General Store, Blacksmith's Shop, Hotel, Undertaker's Shop, Township Offices, Hall and Fair Grounds, and County Court. My local guide said it had been burned down by neighbours to drive out the famous "Black Donnellys," but I think that was a fabrication. Other accounts say its demise began when it was bypassed by the railroad.

    New homes are being built there now.

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    1. Sounds very fascinating! I wasn't sure where the area was, so I looked it up. It is similar to many towns located near here that I enjoy driving through and photographing. The "Black Donnellys"! They live on thanks to Canadian folklore!

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  5. Interesting. Some small towns here in Nova Scotia seem to be ghost towns or are heading that way. It is a shame that this occurs, don't you think. Think of all that history.

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    1. It is a shame, but something that can't be avoided. People live in areas where they can work and thrive, and will move on if the area they live in cannot support that.

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  6. BC has a lot of ghost towns too. I used to love to go and poke around in them, imagining the people.

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    1. It is fun to wander through these areas, particularly if you have a camera in hand --- and imagination!

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  7. Martha, check out Ernestown Railway Station. Scott & I found it on one of our scooter rides just outside of our city. Thanks for this post as it is always interesting to see "ghost towns" and ponder what the history is.

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    1. Sounds so interesting! I will have to check this out! Thanks, Cathy.

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  8. I don't think we have any in Niagara. But I would find it fascinating to see one, although very sad.

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    1. It is sad. Whenever I happen upon a home like this, it gives me a feeling of despair.

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  9. I don't think we have many of those around here.

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