Tuesday, May 21, 2013

In The Garden

With the crazy weather in the past few months, growth in the garden is late this year. The plants are surfacing slowly, but at least they are surfacing. There is a lot to do in the backyard, and I’ve spent a lot of time out there. And despite how exhausted I become, it’s the type of exhaustion that I welcome. Below are some of the sightings in the garden...

The bulbs are all done, but it was a wonderful show while it lasted.



“Goodbye my lovely daffodils. I’ll see you all next year!”


One of my favourite early perennials is the lovely Euphorbia polychroma with its beautiful yellow blooms that practically glow in the dark.




This is Lysimachia punctata 'Alexander'. I added it to the garden for its gorgeous foliage.



Iris pallida ‘Aureo Variegata’ produces very attractive blooms, but the foliage is also spectacular.



You can’t go wrong with hardy English Primrose.


This is an ideal shade plant; one of my favourite things about it.



Oh, those wonderful columbines. I want to grow all of them. This one is Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Mellow Yellow’



And finally for today, the astounding blooms of Pulsatilla vulgaris.


This perennial produces crocus-like flowers in shades of lilac to violet-purple.


It is drought tolerant once it’s established, and it blooms a second time later in the season.


It is one of the first plants to bloom in the spring; a very welcome sight after a long, cold winter.


And that’s all for now. There are many beautiful flowers coming up, and I look forward to them all gracing my garden.

Have a great day, everyone.

20 comments:

  1. Your garden must be looking so pretty now, so many lovely flowers.

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    1. Yes, it's finally awake! Last year was very hot and dry, and the garden suffered. It wasn't a good season.

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  2. Oh what a beautiful show! Just lovely

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  3. Oh Martha, how spectacular! I love the p. vulgaris the most. But how on earth did it get such an odd name - unless vulgaris doesn't me what it sounds like in English?? Hope you had a good week-end!

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    1. Francie, I swear I was thinking the same thing when I was taking photos of this lovely perennial. I have no idea who named it, or why it's named that way, but it's not a pretty name!

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  4. Oh, we have some Euphorbia polychroma in our front flower bed too but I never knew what it was called before! Thanks for the info.

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    1. It's one of my favourite plants in the garden. It's gorgeous, and very reliable. It puts on an amazing display every year no matter the weather.

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  5. Martha, your photos are wonderful! We used to have p.vularis for a few years but due to wet climate here they eventually left us.
    Our garden is slow this year as well.....the temperature had dipped close to 0 C two nights in a row. Oh well, we'll have blossoms a little longer when they do arrive.

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    1. The gardening season is quite delayed, but better late than never, I say! I'm just happy to see all this gorgeous growth!

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  6. Oh, how gorgeous Martha! You sure do Mother Nature proud with your green thumb and camera!

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    1. I love Mother Nature! I can't imagine a world without all her beautiful children.

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  7. You do have some beauties this year. The bulbs lasted fairly long here because of the cool weather. Euphorbia polychroma is always brillant. I've lost all my pulsatillas...aaargh! Too wet of a winter I guess. I had then for so many years too. I have started a nursery bed for plants that need help. I'm beginning to think that I should have done this years ago to make sure all that money did go to waste. In my next life I guess!

    Lovely flowers you have!

    Ron

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    1. I know how you feel! I lost a lot of plants because of last year's extreme heat and drought. And some were favourites. It was quite upsetting. I tried so hard to help all of them get through the dryness, but not all of them were able to survive it. I love the idea of a nursery bed to help the ailing plants! Dr. Ron's botanical clinic!

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    2. The idea of a "save my plants and $ too" came to me a couple years ago. Seriously, it's worth digging up a safe spot for those ailing plants. I bought a speckled violet a few years ago and because our garden is so huge the poor feller just got lost and overgrown. I saw it poking it's wee speckled head out from under some greenery one morning. Got the spade and dug that sucker up. Now, it's so happy and has multipied X 5 . So I'm always doing this now. Hellebores, epimediums, bee balm and the list goes on. Hope it's worth trying for you!

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    3. It certainly won't hurt! I've been walking around the garden looking for last year's damage from the severe drought and heat we had. I lost several plants, some of which I loved. Perhaps if I'd moved them last year to other spots in the garden, they may have survived. Not worth worrying about it now. What's done is done. But a small garden clinic is certainly worth the time and effort to avoid the loss of plants, and to save $$

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  8. Wow, your garden is just lovely. The primroses are so sweet -- really cheerful, like they're doing the flower version of smiling. It must be such a fun challenge to plant according to the seasons -- here, it's all just there year round lol!

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    1. I love the primroses. I didn't add them right away because I wasn't sure I'd like them. But I'm so glad I finally did! I'll have to search for some more.

      It can be fun planting for different seasons, but our winters are much too long, which leaves a very barren outdoors for months on end!

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