Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Photo Dump

"You learn to see by practice. ... The more you look around at things, the more you see. The more you photograph,
the more you realize what can be photographed and what can't be photographed. You just have to keep doing it."
- Eliot Porter -

I’ve been using a camera and taking pictures since my early teens, but I’ve only been concentrating on ‘making’ photographs for the past couple of years. What has changed is that I am no longer in a hurry to press the shutter button. My camera is just an instrument to record what my eyes have already framed. By looking around first, I discover a world of subject matter. Then I pick up my camera.

This week’s photos are all about rust and decay; one of my favourite themes.

Photos can be found close to home. This is the lock on our garden shed.


Zoomed in on the hand crank at the Kingston Mills lockstation.


The side of a bridge.


Rusty door handles always grab my attention.


A close-up shot of mausoleum doors at the local cemetery.


Interesting subject matter can be found on walls of old buildings.


Just about everything here is rotting away. Definitely worth photographing!


Do you see the face?


Don't forget to look down for photo subjects.


Even old sewers make for interesting photos.

A wonderful Tuesday, to all!

(P.S – Make sure to stop by tomorrow for a special post!)

24 comments:

  1. Beautiful photos, on an interesting topic.

    Can't wait to see what you have for tomorrow!

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    1. This is one of my favourite photography themes. I really enjoy it.

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  2. You've got a beautiful eye for wabi sabi. It's a real gift!

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    1. Thank you, Debra! Even the term wabi sabi is appealing to me; a term discovered through you!

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  3. I love each and everyone of these forgotten rusted, unused objects, you gave them life, and I love them, bravo bravo bravo, and of course it'll be here tomorrow I am always here everyday, think I'd miss a day, never unless of course storms turns into heavy ice and kills the connection and the electricity goes away...but if not I'm here...atta girl for taking on the left-overs and making them a work of art!!!

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    1. Thank you, Lorraine! You ALWAYS make me smile. Your comments are so much fun.

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  4. Wonderful photography! I wonder what the old crossbars on the side of the building were used for?

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    1. I was wondering the same thing when I photographed them!

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  5. Very nice ! I am the same I search for what my eyes catch and like and try to capture it ! I started out in photography when I was 18 and had a Minolta 34 mm camera and developed my own film back then but I soo prefer the digital and what can be done on the computer with them ! Thanks for sharing ! Have a good week !

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    1. That is great! I never did develop film, but I would have liked to for the experience. I also prefer the digital camera. You can take hundreds of photos and not care if you have to scrap a few. Doesn't cost a thing --- unlike using film!

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  6. Martha, you kindred spirit you! These photos speak for themselves and the photographer who took them!
    Yes I saw the face and LOVED that photo.
    Maybe we are related!?

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    1. You just never know, Jim, maybe we are! We certainly share the photo gene...hahaha...

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  7. LOVE these, so much! You are giving me ideas!!!!

    Thanks!
    Ron

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    1. Just like you give me ideas! I think that's what I enjoy most about looking at photos that other people have taken.

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  8. How is it that rust and decay become so beautiful when our eyes are guided by your camera? Such a talent you have, Martha! Loved these!

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    1. Thank you, Francie! That is very kind. There is something beautiful in rust and decay; the camera helps us to zoom in on that.

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  9. "My camera is just an instrument to record what my eyes have already framed. By looking around first, I discover a world of subject matter. Then I pick up my camera."

    Exactly, Martha… isn't that what you all a photographic eye? ;) … I see things and think … oh, I gotta capture this… I started with a little ol Brownie camera … got my Girl Scout Badge! even processed the black and white film… then in the 70's got a 35mm and all manner of lenses and filters and film speeds.

    I have tons of slides… but where are they… sigh

    Now… I just point my iPhone and shoot. Great memories … and no bunches of thinning and thawing… amazing… it ain't art but it's just plain fu!

    Love your pictures … and the way you see your world…. good stuff

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    1. thinning and thawing? HAHaaaaa... what was I typing ... auto correct is reeeeally fun... guess it was thising and thating... HAHaaa oh, me.

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    2. I used to love 35mm cameras; if only the film wasn't so expensive to process and replace. I never did learn to develop my own film, but I think I would have liked to. Still, I do prefer the digital cameras. They are so easy to work with. And those iPhones have some great photo taking abilities!

      Hahahha...yes, that auto correct is hilarious. Sometimes I run across some funny images of that!

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  10. Most people would ignore relics and not think of them worth photographing. You've given good advice. Now the next time somebody photographs me I'm going to have to wonder if they are photographing me as a relic!!!

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    1. Hahahaha...that is funny, Red! Perhaps they will simply find you interesting. Some people have very interesting faces that the camera just loves.

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  11. You have such an amazing eye, Martha!

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    1. Thank you! I enjoy finding interesting things in my surroundings.

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