Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Dumb and Dumber


This can also be filed under irony.

Have a lovely day, everyone.

34 comments:

  1. yep, not much to say about that..........

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  2. Even if I wasn't first generation here (father's side), I still would not agree with this. It's not funny, or dumb, but it is pointless and sad.

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    1. Definitely sad. Although I do find some humour in it in an ironic way. I love when these types of people end up looking like asses!

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  3. I guess you don't need to know how to spell to speak English! LOL

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  4. Hahahahaha, actually I'm surprised that "privilege" is spelled correctly. That can be a hard word to spell!

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    1. I know, I thought the same thing! But I'm guessing it's spell check. I wrote the sentence up in Word and it passed the spelling, so chances are "privilege" was originally misspelled and it was corrected. The rest of the sentence was accepted.

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  5. It is so difficult to squeeze common sense through a narrow mind. Interesting find.

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    1. Hahaha! Yes, it certainly is. I love your comment. Sums it up perfectly!

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  6. Ah yes, let's plaster our ignorance all over the car window.

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  7. Yep, certainly a bit of irony here. I have to say though, I don't care for the verbage, but I do have a bit of a problem in someone coming here to live as their country and taking advantage of the wonderful things offered here and then not learning the language. I could be a bit prejudiced about this, but before we moved we lived 10 minutes away from the Mexican border by Tijuana. I couldn't get a job where we lived because I didn't speak Spanish. Something wrong about that I think. But again, that is just my take on it.

    betty

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    1. You're entitled to your opinion, Betty, and I can see you have no trouble expressing it...LOL... This is how you feel and have a right to express it.

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  8. Some of these people just never get it.

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  9. I have to deal with people like this all the time. They obviously never tried to learn a language seriously before. It takes years to be fluent. Also I think the majority of the anti-immigration debate is just plain racism. All the southern republicans are too worried about Hispanic men with Caucasian women.

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    1. I agree with you, Adam. I'm not really bothered by the first generation not becoming completely fluent. Most are busy working hard, raising families and getting through tough times. As long as they are decent folks that respect fellow citizens and their new country, that's good enough for me. The next generation (their children) is always fluent in the language, and that's good enough for me.

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  10. I wonder if anyone ever pointed out the errors to the driver of this truck?

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    1. And if anyone ever did, I wonder what the response would be!

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  11. Brilliantly ironic! LOL! I've caught up on all your posts,Martha and the story of your marriage breaking up and its aftermath continues to be inspiring. It just amazes me how similar some of our feelings were. I asked the same questions. Why? Why? How? How? I thought feeling numb was bad until the pain kicked in. Emotional pain is physically real; and I had to beat back suicidal thoughts; I just wanted the pain to end. I guess that's one place our experiences are different, and perhaps having children you loved and were responsible for made the difference. If it weren't for a tough old driller on an oil rig in Kansas, I might not be alive today. But like you, I got past the nightmare to a better life. It does take a long, long time to exorcise the bad things that happened and to become whole again. And learning to trust again is very, very hard. And like you, I protected my heart in a thick shell ~ Heart in a Clay Pot I came to think of it as, but Terry cracked it open. I can't say I regret what I went through. It made me who I am today, and I never would have met Terry if I had chosen a different path. I did have an even earlier choice near the end of university to live a normal, genteel, ordered life, but the prospect filled me with a fear of being smothered; so I fled. Consequently, I've had a life so rich in all kinds of experiences. I'm grateful for that because it has increased my tolerance and compassion for others. Life can be tough, but it is magnificent none-the-less. Loved your additional Cuba and Havana photos ~ and the clown photo of your hubby!

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    1. Your journey sounds so fascinating, Louise! Sometimes we need to walk a tough path to get to the happily ever after. And I'll tell you one thing: because of my lousy first marriage, I appreciate my present one 100 times more. It's like night and day!

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  12. Wow, that is some advertising for a country.

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  13. I guess some have 'patent' on it!

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