Friday, August 7, 2015

Question Of The Day

What is your ancestral heritage?



I am a descendant of Greeks. My mother came to Canada in 1957 and my father joined her in 1960; they were married a few months after he arrived.

My brother also traced our ancestry through a simple DNA analysis a couple of years ago and the results showed that we are 51% Mediterranean, 27% Northern European, and 20% Southwest Asian. Besides Greece, the most common DNA match that we have is with Sardinia, Tuscany/Italy, Bulgaria, and Iberia (Spain/Portugal).

He stated in the email he sent me that from what he understands "everyone in Europe has Southwestern DNA.  It happened when early humans pushed North from Africa.  Then people from Iran, Tajikistan, western India mixed with people from Northern Europe around central Europe.  Then of course, they moved south to Greece, etc." It is all so fascinating!

(Incidentally, although quite exaggerated, the movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” is fairly accurate in depicting Greek families. Except for the Windex. Greeks do not use Windex neurotically. At least no one I know.)

Your turn. What is your ancestral heritage?

Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

47 comments:

  1. Family history can be traced right back to Norway. I find doing family trees a fascinating hobby and have been searching it for years. I think if traced back far enough most will originate from the same area.

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    1. I totally agree, Linda. We certainly would originate from the same area!

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  2. Pure German and when the ancestors came to the new world they settled in Pennsylvania Dutch country. I love my older relatives PA Dutch accents.

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    1. I know, right? The neighbourhood I grew up in consisted of people that had come from different areas of the world, but mostly from Europe. And they all had accents; some of them so interesting! I love to hear them speak.

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  3. I figure I am 7/8 Chinese 1/8 Jamaican being of Chinese/Jamaican ethnicity.

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  4. Fun post, Martha! I think family history is a fascinating study, and it's neat that your brother had a DNA test done. I am mostly Scot Irish from three of my grandparents and 25% Thai from my maternal grandmother. I also have English, Dutch, and a little bit of Austrian and/or German.

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    1. Quite an interesting mix, especially the Thai, which originates so far away from the others!

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  5. I am Irish, English, German and Cherokee American. Irish from the years of the potato famine, English and German directly through Ellis Island four generations back. Cherokee by adoption. My folks were traveling by wagon train, found a native American camp with all members massacred and what could burn was burning. They stopped and searched for survivors. They were a baby's cry, the only surviving member. They took her to the next town to see if anyone could take her in. They suggested she be "knocked in the head" because no one wanted a "savage" My family raised her as their own. She was my great grandmother on my mother's side.

    I have the Cherokee cheek bones and blue Irish eyes and some say the infamous Irish temper.

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    1. Wow, what a great story! Now that is one interesting family history. How wonderful that your parents took that baby in. And how horrible what happened to her family.

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    2. This happened a few generations before me. I think it was a good thing and set the tone for generations of tolerant accepting people.

      Thanks for visiting, too.

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    3. Oh, I meant to write the adoptive family (from the past), not your parents! Sometimes my fingers go faster than my brain...LOL... Anyhow, it is a very fascinating history!

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  6. Russian, Jewish, Polish, Canadian, and English. We don't use Windex much, but we deep-fry everything.

    Be well, Good Martha.

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    1. Hahaha...I love that your threw that in, Robyn :)

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  7. Hubby's brother had his DNA analysis and was surprised at the results that came through, which was different from what their parents had told them their ancestry was :)

    I'm 100% Polish; I'm 1st generation American on my dad's side since he emigrated to the United States after WW2 and 2nd generation on my mom's side since her parents came from Poland back in 1900.

    Happy weekend!

    betty

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    1. That is interesting about your husband's brother! DNA certainly surprises some people.

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  8. Lots o' German, some Irish, wee bit of Scottish, a pinch of English.

    Funnily enough I went from one not-so-common German maiden name to another not-so-common German last name when I married! I kinda knew I could never be a "Smith," if I don't have to spell it out over the phone three times, it just ain't German enough!

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  9. 52% Irish, 26% Western Europe, 8% Scandinavian, 7% British, 3% Italian/Greek, 3% Portugese/Spanish, and less or about 1% European Jewish. Got to love DNA tests

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    1. Most certainly, Adam! DNA tests are fascinating.

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  10. English, Irish and Scottish.........no Welsh though that I know of!!!

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  11. Well, we did this too, really dug in and found out and conclusion was, I'm half baker, half smart ass.

    PS: Waiting on Frankenberry to get home. Quick supper home then off to Barnes to kick off the weekend.

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    1. Oh my gosh, we had such a nice weekend. And on top of that, we hit Apple Castle and
      picked up yummy heirloom apples. They grow bunches, so we snagged the last of the Transparent apples and then some Earligolds. YUM!

      Hope you sleep better tonight. I'm catching up on your blogs ... off to the next one.

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    2. It sounds like lots of fun! I sure hope sleep is much easier tonight. But all in all, I had a pretty good day despite the lack of sleep. I guess it just hasn't caught up to me yet!

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  12. I have some trouble with ancestry. We tend to thing more in national terms as far as ancestry is concerned. After that it gets very mixed. My Dad was German and my Mom was English! Pretty simple. My adopted daughter is Scottish, French and Ukranian. You see where I'm going. I consider myself white!

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    1. I do see where you're going. Your daughter's ancestry will be quite fascinating and very interesting to explain!

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  13. We are mostly from England but my great grandfather was from Russia. One line of my family has been in Canada for 160 years. I have a subscription to Ancestry World so I am able to find a lot of information.

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    1. You've written about your ancestry search and I find it so fascinating. My brother has been digging into our family history for the past few years and he's discovered some very interesting information. Apparently, my father's side of the family, in addition to Canada, spread to many different areas around the world. It's a lot of fun to learn about all this.

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  14. As far as I am aware all family are from England ...

    Have a super weekend, hope your 'Job a Day' plan is going well !

    All the best Jan

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    1. It is going great, Jan, thanks for mentioning it!

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  15. 3/4 English, 1/4 Russian. And I am blonde and very fair. But my married name sounds Italian (actually Swiss) so people can be surprised when they see me!

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    1. Just a little something to make them say "hmmm..."

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  16. Fantastic, Martha, let's go to Greece and YOU take all the photos!!
    It's funny but I just did some research on my family tree and surprise, surprise...on both paternal and maternal...from England!
    Martha, I see that you are now a follower of mine! You have made my day! (I sometimes "follow" bloggers, but don't notice that I have not signed up to do so. Do you know what I mean?)

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    1. Actually, I've been following your blog for a long time but changed my email address on my blog and had to re-follow! So I'm not a new follower, just an old follower with a new profile. I would love to visit Greece, Kay, but it's too pricey. Maybe when the lottery kicks in!

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  17. Such an amazing history in Greece! You must be so proud of your heritage!

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    1. I certainly am, Francie. Sometimes I like to think that I stem from some great people in the country's history! It doesn't hurt to dream :)

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  18. WINDEX has killed me, or should I say killed my lungs because of my mother's need for squeaky clean windows all 18 large + small panes of them......so glad I have a small house now! I have to leave a restaurant as soon as they pull that "HUMAN KILLER" out!!!!!!!
    Now I have done the Geno Project too ~~ give me some time and I'll fill you in! I haven't looked at it sin a year ago!!

    Cheers and no WINDEX crosses into my house evah!!

    Ron

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    1. Windex is a pretty nasty product. Lucky for us, we can't use Windex on our windows; it'll ruin them. A mixture of vinegar and water does the job, and it's so much better for us!

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    2. I am now re-reading all my GENO 2.0 info so this is going to take some time. Hopefully I'll understand it and be able to explain things again.

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  19. I'm a descendant of Italians. My mother was born in the USA but her family moved back to Italy when she was a baby. So Italian was her native language. Then she moved back to USA and my father followed her.
    Maybe I'll try a DNA test if it's not too expensive.
    Thanks for joining my blog.

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    1. Do you speak Italian? I think it's such a beautiful language. I grew up listening to it. Many of the kids I went to high school with were born in Canada but their parents had come from Italy. In fact, the majority of our school was made up of kids of Italian descent. I'd say just about all of them spoke Italian and when they didn't want you to know what they're saying, they switched to their mother tongue!

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    2. I didn't know there were many Italians in Canada. My parents spoke Italian at home but we were encouraged to speak only English.

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  20. Well now that's easy, Montreal, Quebec, Montreal Quebec, Montreal, Quebec, Montreal Quebec, Quebec X5 then Paris, France before that I do not know all I know is there is a rumour in our family that when the blond Parisian woman with blue eyes came to Montreal she has a wild affair with a native....and that's why in all the family half have blue eyes and blond hair and the other half, dark hair, dark eyes, well hazel in my case lol

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    1. Well, that would make sense, Lorraine. A lot of Quebecers also have Irish heritage in addition to their French. And from here on in, a lot of future generations will have multiple heritages. I think that's pretty cool.

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